Overall Score: 9/10
Dynamics: 9/10
Accessibility: 4/10
Underground credibility: 10/10
Pros: Innovators of Post-Rock stay one step ahead of the pack
Cons: Not quite as furious as earlier classics

If you aren’t familiar with Neurosis in any way then take this as a warning as much as a recommendation, Neurosis are heavy. Heavy in every possible way conceivable. No matter how much Tore Von Leathertrousers shrieks about Satan in a forest in Norway or how many times groups of bodybuilders in basketball vests with neck tattoos grunt about “fucking you up” over endless beatdowns, Neurosis will always be the last word in the true definition of heaviness due to their inert ability to reach deep down inside themselves and drag up their own personal fears, failings and loathing.

All of this makes Honor ‘Found In Decay’ mildly surprising as, whilst hardly being the sort of album you’d play musical chairs to, it features the odd snippet of positivity amongst the world weary distain that the band have become so associated with. In one hour the seven tracks here take the listener on a journey of such breathtaking scope that reaching the end feels like seeing the credits roll on a piece of epic cinema. Picking out individual tracks is fairly pointless as Neurosis don’t really deal in songs as stand-alone pieces, rather they build and mould what they have already established, but the nearly twelve minute long ‘My Heart For Deliverance’ is Neurosis in a microcosm. A slow building, tribal beat, an incredible understanding of musical dynamics that include all manner of instruments and a lyrical delivery that goes from furious rage to pained regret. It’s not always easy to listen to, but given time and complete focus you’ll find yourself totally immersed in Steve Von Till and Scott Kelly’s tortured, weathered vocals.

After the slightly disappointing ‘Given To The Rising’ album this is a return worthy to stand shoulder to shoulder with previous Neurosis masterpieces like ‘Through Silver In Blood’ and ‘Times Of Grace’. Older, wiser, more mature and with one tiny slither of sunlight poking through their pitch black skyline, Neurosis have returned and it’s an honour to have them back.