Thy Art Is Murder – Human Target

Overall Score: 8.5/10
riffs: 9/10
lyrics: 8/10
overall presentation: 8/10
Pros: Some of the bands strongest songs | Lyrics that pack a punch
Cons: Very little

Deathcore is an ugly word and a lazy term designed by self-serving journalists to lump together a group of bands together in a neat package. It’s a buzzword used as clickbait and doesn’t do justice to the bands unfairly tarnished with it.

Thy Art Is Murder is one of the bands that were targeted for inclusion in this group and truth be told they couldn’t be further from it. They are arguably one of the brightest stars amongst the current generation of metal acts and a true full-blooded death metal act to boot. Human Target is their fifth full-length album and frankly it may end up being hailed as their best. It certainly has a classic sound to it that will take the listener back to the very beginning with some really strong early Cannibal Corpse and Obituary running through it’s DNA. With that said this isn’t brutality for the sake of it, there are layers here and songs with purpose and message, it just happens that those messages come armed with some of the most savage riffs and bastard heavy blast beats known to man.

Thy Art Is Murder are a band that revels in heaviness in every sense of the word, what they lack in theatrics and the shock tactics employed by some of their peers they more than make up for in the weight of their words. There aren’t many metal records with such wide ranging topics as religion, war, genoicide, politics and even the everyday war that we all face ourselves be it on the streets or in our own heads, and it’s in combining all these things with heft and state of the art musicianship that Thy Art Is Murder have allowed themselves to rise above the rest of the bands that surround them and it will surely be the thing that keeps them pushing the envelope forward for years to come. This isn’t a reinvention of the wheel so much as it taking the wheel and using it to crush all other underneath it.

Posted by: Simon Crampton on 26th July 2019

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